'Crescent', by McCoy Tyner

McCoy Tyner rose to prominence as a member of John Coltrane’s legendary quartet in the 1960’s, but he sustained a brilliant solo career in the decades that followed. Today’s song ‘Crescent' ís by Coltrane, originally issued on the 1964 album with the same name, featuring McCoy Tyner.
An almost hour-long(!) version of ‘Crescent' would later appear on 'John Coltrane Live In Japan.

McCoy Tyner - Soliloquy

Soliloquy. Hmm, as a non-native English speaker I had to look that one up. A soliloquy is when a character (in a play) relates his thoughts and feelings to himself and to the audience without addressing any of the other characters, and is delivered often when they are alone or think they are alone.
It’s not the same as a monologue, because than you are talking to the other characters, for a longer time. And it’s not the same as an ‘aside’, which is the same as a soliloquy, only very short, basically just one comment.

Are you still with me?

The ‘to be or not to be' speech in 'Hamlet’ is wrongly considered the most famous soliloquy in the English language because it is in fact a monologue delivered to Ophelia and to the spying Polonius and King Claudius. 
Juliet’s “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" is a good example of a Shakespearean soliloquy (although Juliet’s speech is overheard by Romeo, she thinks that she is alone with her thoughts when she delivers it, which is in the essence of a soliloquy).
 

The album ‘Soliloquy' was recorded at the Merkin Hall, New York from February 19th to February 21st, 1991.

McCoy Tyner - Piano

Miles Away
Done. Finished. During my summer holiday (somewhere in July) I started to read ‘Milestones’ by Jack Chambers. Immediately followed (!) by ‘Miles: The Autobiography’ by Quincy Troupe. That’s a grand total of 1286 pages on Miles, finished only yesterday.
I recommend both books: the one from Jack Chambers for it’s meticulousness on facts and the one from Troupe for Miles’ own voice you hear through.
Enter Ben Ratliff’s ‘The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music’. Ratliff, jazz critic for The New York Times and writer of the book ‘Coltrane: The Story Of A Sound’, spent just over two years interviewing jazz greats for a recurring feature at the paper: rather than ask musicians like Wayne Shorter or Sonny Rollins to name their favorite records, Ratliff sat with them as they listened to songs and picked out the qualities they found most artistically compelling.
An inspiring read so far.

Miles Away

Done. Finished. During my summer holiday (somewhere in July) I started to read ‘Milestones’ by Jack Chambers. Immediately followed (!) by ‘Miles: The Autobiography’ by Quincy Troupe. That’s a grand total of 1286 pages on Miles, finished only yesterday.

I recommend both books: the one from Jack Chambers for it’s meticulousness on facts and the one from Troupe for Miles’ own voice you hear through.

Enter Ben Ratliff’s ‘The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music’. Ratliff, jazz critic for The New York Times and writer of the book ‘Coltrane: The Story Of A Sound’, spent just over two years interviewing jazz greats for a recurring feature at the paper: rather than ask musicians like Wayne Shorter or Sonny Rollins to name their favorite records, Ratliff sat with them as they listened to songs and picked out the qualities they found most artistically compelling.

An inspiring read so far.

'Naima' by John Coltrane & band, Belgium 1965

It was raining heavily, everything and everybody was damp.

Just look at the steam coming of off Elvin Jones…

Or, as Ben Ratliff writes in his book ‘Coltrane: The Story Of A Sound’:

"…A filmed performance exists of Coltrane with his quartet, from august 1, 1965, in Comblain-la-Tour, Belgium. It is a comfortable group…But that workmanlike comfort involves rigorous playing.

The bridge of ‘Naima’ becomes torn, agitated, almost baleful, with Jones occupying the far back end of the beat and Garrison sketching impulsively around the tonic.

At the conclusion of this superb ‘Naima’, Coltrane doesn’t acknowledge the applause. Even before the last beat of the song he darts off to his left to fetch his soprano saxophone, and then starts to play ‘My Favorite Things…”

Ben Ratliff, ‘Coltrane: The Story Of A Sound’ (page 96)

John Coltrane - Tenor Saxophone
McCoy Tyner - Piano
Jimmy Garrison - Bass
Elvin Jones - Drums